☆New Services Always Added!

Last Updated: May 16, 2014

 


 

Maps are great for finding things that you already know are there. If you want to know where a Target is in your area it's easy enough to pop over to Google Maps and search for Target. Unfortunately, maps are really bad (incapable, actually) of telling you what's provided in your area. Availability.net strives to offer a comprehensive list of what services are available broken out by zip code. That way, if you want to know what you can get in your zip code you can simply go to that page and find out.

 

Time Warner Cable Mergers and Net Neutrality Expectations for Charter


Posted: July 06, 2015 by David Curry



A little over two months ago a proposed merger between Comcast and Time Warner Cable (TWC) was called off. Almost no time passed before Charter Communications entered into an agreement to purchase TWC for roughly $57 billion. As the calendar turns to July, there remains a certain level of uncertainty surrounding the details of this proposed purchase, as well as how the FCC will respond to the bid.

 

Early after its announcement in 2014, the bid by Comcast to purchase TWC was considered a long shot. Claims from within the broadband community, consumer advocate groups, and the public all made it clear that they were concerned with the creation of what would have been the largest TV operator in the United States. Even the Chairman of the FCC, Tom Wheeler, expressed his opposition to the merger. Wheeler’s main point of contention, however, was that if the purchase were allowed to proceed, it would create an unfair competitive advantage for Comcast in the broadband market. In particular, the company would have enjoyed a controlling share of almost 60% among broadband providers. Ultimately it was this near monopoly, coupled with the lack of any penalty fee for ending the agreement, which caused Comcast to back out of the deal.

 

Drawing lessons from the failed deal between Comcast and TWC, Charter has begun to promote how its proposed purchase of TWC will not alter the television or broadband playing field on the national stage. The CEO of Charter, Tom Rutledge, has stressed that even if his company is successful in acquiring TWC and Bright House, the newly expanded company will still be only the second largest provider of cable and high speed internet services behind Comcast. At most, Charter would supply about 20% of all TV customers and 29% of all broadband customers. Another issue that Charter does not need to address is that unlike Comcast, which has a financial interest in Hulu, there is no concern that Charter may regulate speeds for video streaming services, such as Netflix or Amazon Prime.

 

Charter is also drawing on the FCC ruling which made broadband a Title II utility as a reason for why its proposed merger should be approved. Rutledge made clear that the footprint of the expanded company would not overlap geographically and that there would remain competition for broadband services offering 25 Mbps in all of its coverage areas. Additionally, he stated that since the majority of the company’s investment is in broadband, not television, it would encourage the expansion of Over the Top (OTT) streaming video services and not impose any sort of data cap on customers. Indeed, subscribers with the new Charter, if the merger is approved, could see significant savings on their broadband subscriptions as their speeds are tripled while their monthly bill is lowered.

 

While the merger works its way through regulatory checks, industry analysts appear confident that the deal will occur. The latest suggestions are that there is a 75% chance that the deal is approved. The FCC has announced that they hope to have this process decided, in favor or opposition of the merger, by the end of 2015.

 

Confirmed and Potential Changes to Sports Bundles and Television Providers


Posted: June 29, 2015 by David Curry



Continuing the trend of breaking apart cable packages, the NBA announced after the 2015 NBA Finals that beginning next season they will be making changes to their League Pass. In existence since 1994, the League Pass for the 2014-2015 season cost $200 and provided subscribers access to over 1,000 games that were not already available on a local sports network in the region. This plan was offered through TV providers and directly from the NBA via their own online video platform designed for iOS, Android, and desktop computers.

 

The changes in the NBA League Pass bundling will allow subscribers to purchase season-long access for a single team or purchase access to individual games. Although the official pricing tiers will not be released until July 2015, industry experts expect that following a single team for the season will range in cost from $50 to $100, while individual game prices will be in the $2 to $5 range. The latest speculation is that the prices for these tiers will be consistent across markets and teams, regardless of their size or popularity. However, the one restriction will be that this unbundled package will only be offered through the NBA’s video platform, rather than through the television providers. In light of this announcement, there have been discussions to resolve some areas of concern between the NBA and their broadcast partners, including ESPN, Turner Networks, and regional sports networks, such as the Los Angeles Lakers’ SportsNet.

 

While analysts praise the NBA for making this decision, and stress the new growth this move is bound to bring to Commissioner Adam Silver’s league, the NBA is bucking the trend of the other professional sports leagues in how they offer their products. MLB and the NHL also have sports packages, while the most famous, and controversial one, is the NFL’s Sunday Ticket Package, which has also been in existence since 1994. Offered exclusively through DirecTV, a lawsuit was filed recently claiming that the NFL’s package structure and use of blackouts are in violation of federal law and need to be overturned. While this lawsuit is just beginning, a recent development in a case involving NHL blackouts and bundled packages may ultimately impact the case against the NFL. The settlement in the NHL case means that for the next five years fans will be able to purchase a package online, known as Game Center Live, that allows them to follow a single team at prices more than 20% below the current cost of bundled packages. Legal experts expect the lawsuit against MLB to be resolved in the same way. All of this suggests that while television providers may be unhappy with the NBA’s voluntary decision to provide a non-bundled package, it may spare the NBA costly legal battles in the future.