Category Archives: AT&T

AT&T Fighting Fines For Throttling Customers’ Data

ATT Logo with a tightened belt around it

Despite the company’s recent success in gaining approval from the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to complete its purchase of DirecTV, AT&T has suffered from a string of legal decisions and regulatory violations that have resulted in sizeable fines. Both the FCC and the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) have taken aim at the telecom firm over what they claim are illegal and unethical practices related to AT&T’s data usage policies.

The FTC’s case began last October when the commission made clear that they were going to sue AT&T for “deceptive and unfair data throttling.” In particular, the lawsuit focuses on customers who have unlimited data plans on their mobile devices. AT&T discontinued the plans years ago, but around 20% of its customers have been grandfathered in and retain the cap-free data packages. However, according to the FTC’s suit, AT&T has actually been imposing a limit on these consumers. This has been occurring in two ways. For those customers with older 3G phone models, a 90% reduction of their speeds took place as soon as they hit 3GB of data during the monthly cycle, while those with LTE phones saw a similar reduction in their speeds after hitting 5GB per month. Ultimately, the crux of the FTC’s lawsuit is that such actions are in violation of the contract signed by unlimited data plan customers. While AT&T claims that no such violation exists, they have modified the language in their contracts to state that throttling will only occur if the user is connected to an overloaded cellular relay.

Around the same time that the FTC’s case got underway, the FCC saw an increase in the number of complaints from AT&T customers who were irritated that their connection speeds had been slowed down. This led the commission to accuse the telecom provider of violating a transparency rule that was part of the Open Internet Order passed in 2010. Although the FCC has known about AT&T’s data throttling policy for the last four years, it was only recently that the number of unhappy customers prompted Chairman Tom Wheeler to level a massive $100 million fine against the mobile service provider.

AT&T is not simply accepting its fate and has vowed to fight the $100 million fine in court, claiming that customers knew full well that their data speeds would be throttled after reaching a certain quota and that no harm came to customers as a result of the slowdown. There is no doubt that AT&T is going to stand its ground for as long as it can on the issue, knowing that the judge in the FTC case may cite the FCC’s actions as a precedent. The telecommunications conglomerate has filed a grievance against the FCC stating that the current fine is excessive and that, at most, AT&T should have to pay only $16,000, even though its policies were not illegal.

 

 

 

T-Mobile Expands Offerings as Customer Totals Increase

T-Mobile coverage map showing all of North America

Over the first six months of 2015, T-Mobile has seen an increase in overall customer totals that was higher than industry analysts expected. During the recent release of subscriber figures, during the second quarter of the year the company added over 2 million new customers across pre- and post-paid accounts. This growth brings the company’s customer total to just under 60 million which, despite the increase, maintains T-Mobile as the fourth largest carrier behind Verizon, AT&T, and Sprint. Commentators in the wireless industry believe that this growth will continue throughout the remainder of the year, although long-term forecasts suggest the promotions T-Mobile has used to elevate its presence in the market will not be sustainable.

In an effort to preempt the predictions that it will not be able to sustain its growth beyond this year, T-Mobile has announced the extension of existing promotions and new ones that it hopes will allow the company to enjoy a larger footprint, both domestically and internationally. One of its most ambitious plans was the offer for any Verizon customer to try T-Mobile for two weeks, absolutely free. The latest reports indicate that this plan was successful during the first quarter but has tapered off during the second quarter, although similar programs for AT&T and Sprint transfer customers have not seen any signs of slowing down.

Similarly, T-Mobile has expanded its two most popular data plan packages. These packages both cost $100 per month, but one includes two phone numbers with unlimited LTE data, while the other offers four phone numbers with 2.5 GB of data per line. Having satisfied its customers by providing an unlimited data plan, T-Mobile is now turning its attention to the part of its consumer base that wants to upgrade phones on a frequent basis. With a new program titled Jump on Demand, for a monthly fee of $10, T-Mobile customers will have the option to upgrade their phone three times per twelve months.

As innovative as the program is to allow multiple phone upgrades annually, T-Mobile’s plan to offer coverage throughout North America, including Mexico and Canada, without roaming fees is being heralded as a game changer. In particular, this plan is attracting attention because it will be available to customers sooner than the plan proposed by AT&T months ago, which will offer similar perks. Under T-Mobile’s plan, subscribers will be able to text, call, and use web services, like email and GPS applications, while in Mexico or Canada without incurring any additional fees. The plan will go live by the start of August 2015.

AT&T Drops Perma-Cookies After Internet Backlash

Reports came out earlier last week, confirming that Verizon Wireless were actively adding perma-cookies. AT&T were also looking into adding perma-cookies to its own mobile phones, in the next year.

However – after the report hit the Web – the Internet unsurprisingly went against AT&T for the plans. It looks like the Internet annoyance was enough for AT&T to remove any plans to add perma-cookies.

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