Tag Archives: wireless

Mobile Faceoff Mid-2015: Samsung vs. Apple

Galaxy S6 phone and iPhone 6 displayed side-by-side

With the top three selling mobile phones in the United States produced by the two companies, it may seem that the rivalry between Samsung and Apple is settling in for the long haul. However, the most recent numbers provide a window into how tumultuous the market is in the highly coveted wireless industry. Apple’s newest launches, the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus, have enjoyed considerable success, in large part because of changes to the operating system, but more importantly, finally increasing the screen size in an effort to appeal to more business users. Samsung’s most recent launches, the Galaxy S6 and the Galaxy S6 Edge, generated considerable buzz from consumers upon their release, but industry analysts speculate that this interest diminished quickly due to a lack of innovative design in the newest Galaxy models.

Despite having the iPhone 6, the number one selling phone, Apple actually lost ground in overall market presence among smartphone users in the first part of 2015. Around 80% of the American population has a smartphone, of which 31% are running a device that has iOS. Compared to this total, roughly 66% of smartphone users have a device running the Android platform. However, in terms of overall profit, Apple saw significant gains during the first few months of the year. This growth has been, in large part, sustained by foreign interest. A prime example of Apple’s profitability in a year when there are no major upgrades planned for the new iPhone is the company’s request for the production of an additional 92 million units. Most of these are destined to be sold in China, although the size of the request to Apple’s manufactures has led some analysts to speculate that the iPhone 6S and iPhone 6S Plus may have more upgrades than initially planned.

Meanwhile, Samsung is scrambling to address its sales issues. Over the last thirty-six months, the company has seen its wireless profits fall every quarter. Part of the issue with the latest phone launch was related to production trouble for the Galaxy S6 Edge screens. Even worse for Samsung though was the negative publicity generated by poor reviews on social media for the S6. Complaints on Facebook and Twitter highlighted underwhelming battery life, problems with clarity when completing calls, and overall concerns that the phone itself was unreliable. While its main line of wireless phones has not lived up to expectations, Samsung’s specialty phones, particularly the Active branch that is designed to survive screen scratches, exposure to water, and the occasional drop onto the floor from table height, has seen remarkable growth. Until it can address the reliability concerns associated with its flagship phones, Samsung may turn its attention to consumers who are looking for a sturdy mobile device that does not require a bulky, limiting case.

T-Mobile Expands Offerings as Customer Totals Increase

T-Mobile coverage map showing all of North America

Over the first six months of 2015, T-Mobile has seen an increase in overall customer totals that was higher than industry analysts expected. During the recent release of subscriber figures, during the second quarter of the year the company added over 2 million new customers across pre- and post-paid accounts. This growth brings the company’s customer total to just under 60 million which, despite the increase, maintains T-Mobile as the fourth largest carrier behind Verizon, AT&T, and Sprint. Commentators in the wireless industry believe that this growth will continue throughout the remainder of the year, although long-term forecasts suggest the promotions T-Mobile has used to elevate its presence in the market will not be sustainable.

In an effort to preempt the predictions that it will not be able to sustain its growth beyond this year, T-Mobile has announced the extension of existing promotions and new ones that it hopes will allow the company to enjoy a larger footprint, both domestically and internationally. One of its most ambitious plans was the offer for any Verizon customer to try T-Mobile for two weeks, absolutely free. The latest reports indicate that this plan was successful during the first quarter but has tapered off during the second quarter, although similar programs for AT&T and Sprint transfer customers have not seen any signs of slowing down.

Similarly, T-Mobile has expanded its two most popular data plan packages. These packages both cost $100 per month, but one includes two phone numbers with unlimited LTE data, while the other offers four phone numbers with 2.5 GB of data per line. Having satisfied its customers by providing an unlimited data plan, T-Mobile is now turning its attention to the part of its consumer base that wants to upgrade phones on a frequent basis. With a new program titled Jump on Demand, for a monthly fee of $10, T-Mobile customers will have the option to upgrade their phone three times per twelve months.

As innovative as the program is to allow multiple phone upgrades annually, T-Mobile’s plan to offer coverage throughout North America, including Mexico and Canada, without roaming fees is being heralded as a game changer. In particular, this plan is attracting attention because it will be available to customers sooner than the plan proposed by AT&T months ago, which will offer similar perks. Under T-Mobile’s plan, subscribers will be able to text, call, and use web services, like email and GPS applications, while in Mexico or Canada without incurring any additional fees. The plan will go live by the start of August 2015.

FCC looking to set the groundwork for 5G in the US

The FCC is looking to hop on the 5G bandwagon, after South Korea, Japan, the UK and a few other countries announced plans to bring the super-fast wireless speed, running on a spectrum above 24GHz.

In a blog post, Chairman of the FCC Tom Wheeler talked about mobile innovation and how it is their duty to work towards faster wireless speeds, to continue innovation in this market and keep the US competitive.

This is a little ironic coming from Wheeler, but we are glad the FCC is taking a more active role in when it comes to wireless speed deployment.

24GHz 5G wireless

5g-speeds

The 24GHz spectrum has only become available thanks to some significant developments in antenna and processing technologies. Previously wireless spectrum was limited to targeted frequencies close to 3GHz.

The move to 24GHz frequencies could boost wireless speeds on mobile devices up to 10Gbps, higher than Google Fiber and all other fiber optic broadband services.

Even though FCC is putting down the groundwork for this 5G incentive, it might not be until 2018/2022 that users will get access to these super-fast speeds, but taking initiative is what counts.

5G Worldwide

5g-evolution

Governments appear more confident in 5G, compared to the slow rollout of 4G over the past few years. South Korea has had 4G LTE for a few years now and has already moved over to LTE+, offering speeds of around 300Mbps.

5G is a larger jump in speed, from 300Mbps to 10Gbps. Compare that to the 3G/4G boost, from 30Mbps to 100Mbps, we can see why governments are more interested in this technical innovation.

South Korea and Japan are normally a lot faster when it comes to deployment of these fast networks, while the United States and UK tend to hold back, especially while carriers work on getting the wireless standard nationwide.

Source: FCC